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pushing up fuel prices. those higher prices come as gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so com
? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's been tracking the high crimes and misdemeanors of wall stree
in washington. mr. vice president, thank you very much for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot and as of last march i got a transplant, got a new heart and it's nothing short of a miracle. it's like taking 30 years off your life. >> rose: some people said to me without that heart transplant your days were numbered. did you have sense of that? >> oh, absolutely. i'd gotten to the point where i'd done bypass and all the various procedures and i got to end stage heart failure, your heart is just no longer moving enough blood to service your vital organs and this was in july of 2010 so i went in for planned surgery. they had to do it on arch emergency basis because everything started to collapse rapidly. and that's when we implanted this -- it's called a
and republicans sparred about who would be blamed if budget cuts go into effect. the white house used its superior bully pulpit to grand effect. today we heard from the president and ray lahood, the cabinet's lone republican. >> what i'm trying to do is to wake up members of the congress on the republican side to the idea that they need to come to the table, offer a proposal so that we don't have to have this kind of calamity in air service in america. >> lahood said air traffic and safety would be drupted. defense secretary le onpennetta said the nation would billion less safe. republicans say it's overblown. how much does the public really care, john? >> well, it's a big deal. but it's not as dramatic as a government shutdown where everybody can see that the washington monument's closed. you left out one, the interior department said that visitors to national parks will find locked restrooms in many places. talk about the hammer coming down. look, it's one of those things that the effects will build over time. airline waits will get longer. and this is one of the things that people who want a lo
the globe. tonight the obama administration denounces the assault on the u.s. embassy in turkey as a terrorist attack. a suicide bomber blew himself up at a security gate killing a turkish security guard and injuring those nearby. according to turkish prime minister, an outlawed marxist group is responsible for the violence. our james reynolds is on the scene and filed this report. >> america's foreign missions are as much fortresses as embassies. this is why. this afternoon, a suicide bomber got to the gate of the u.s. embassy but but no further. his explosives detonated as a checkpoint. the bomber and a turkish security guard were killed. >> i wasn't sure what the explosion was. so i ran to see. they were body parts on the road. arms and legs but i didn't want to look any further. >> the attack on the embassy makes for a bitter last day of work for america's chief diplomats. >> i spoke with the ambassador and the team there. i spoke with my turkish counterparts and i told them how much we valued their commitment and their sacrifice. >> this is not the first time that western t
military is, even if millions of enemies is half as we will win. - attack us we will one. >> this was about half as a parable of the atom -- powerful of the atom bombs america dropped on japan. last december, north korea put a satellite into orbit. it was in defiance of u.n. resolutions and marked a major step in its reocket technology. they say they have made a nuclear bomb that may be small of to mount on the rocket. kim jong-un is barely 30 years old. some thought he might bring change to this port country. he seems to have decided nuclear bombs, not economic reform, is what will guarantee the survival of his regime. the korean peninsula was divided by war 60 years ago. south koreans reach beyond the dreams of northerners have grown used to protect and have shut them off. north korea has managed to militarize their nuclear weapons. the implications are far reaching and will change calculations. this proposes a more serious threat. >> it is so decided. >> in new york, led the security council met for security talks. china has condemned the test. did the budget for the north, beijing is un
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. the explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injured into an awaiting ambulance. u.s. ambassador to turkey francis ricciardone spoke to reporters outside the embassy. >> right now, we are all dealing with our sadness at the loss of our fellow member of our embassy. we salute his bravery, his service to turkey and to turkish-american friendship. our hearts go out to his family. >> brown: in istanbul, prime minister recep tayyip erdogan called the bombing an "attack against peace in our country." and in washington, the state department's victoria
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on saturdays. but home and business mail would end. the move would save an estimated $2 billion annually. the postal service ended the last budget year with a record loss, nearly $16 billion. today's decision was criticized by several members of congress who may try to overule the agency. and the head of the letter carrier's union called the move "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect." joining us now is postmaster general patrick donohoe. and welcome to you. you spoke today being in a "very scary position financially." how scary? >> well, here's where we are right flow. now. as you mentioned we had a pretty substantial loss last year and those were accounting losses. $11.1 billion of the $15.9 is attributed to prepayment for retiree health care that we didn't pay. we defaulted. you have
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 e
like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening, the u.s. government has been secretly targeting its enemies for years now, using unmanned aircraft to do the work. but this was the first week they said so out loud through a leaked white house white paper, that is, newly released legal memos and a high-profile confirmation for the next c.i.a. chief, a window was opened this week into how our wars are now waged, even when americans are the targets. >> we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there is an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. gwen: the attorney general's words were carefully worded and john brennan, the likely new c.i.a. director was just as precise. >> the president has insisted that any actions we take will be legally grounded, will be thoroughly anchored in intelligence, will have the appropriate review process, approval process before any action is contemplated, including those actions that migh
. this is why. this afternoon, a suicide bomber got to the gate of the u.s. embassy but but no further. his explosives detonated as a checkpoint. the bomber and a turkish security guard were killed. >> i wasn't sure what the explosion was. so i ran to see. they were body parts on the road. arms and legs but i didn't want to look any further. >> the attack on the embassy makes for a bitter last day of work for america's chief diplomats. >> i spoke with the ambassador and the team there. i spoke with my turkish counterparts and i told them how much we valued their commitment and their sacrifice. >> this is not the first time that western targets in curky have been hit -- turkey have been hit. in 2003 truck bombs hit targets in istanbul, including the u.k. consulate. those attacks were carried out by al qaeda affiliated groups. turkey says that this u.s. embassy attack was carried out by a leftist militant organization. the effect is the same. >> america is the target, there are nationalist, left wing group, as well as islamists in tushy who are not happy with their relationship with washingto
york. >> susie: even though those retail numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700
and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i don't think they l.
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beate
of italian bonds was well received, fending off new worries about the european debt crisis. and here in the u.s., january durable goods orders rose almost 2%, for their largest gain in over a year, and well above expectations for a modest 0.2% gain. the stock market got no help today from technology giant apple, apple shares slipped about one percent after investors were disappointed nothing concrete came out of the company's annual shareholder meeting. no word on a stock split, new product or most of all what apple plans to do with all its cash. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: "a" is for apple, and it turns apple is for cash, and holding on to lots of it. despite ample pressure from investors, c.e.o. tim cook still has no concrete plans for the company's $137 billion war chest. at apple's annual shareholder meeting today, cook said the company's board remained in quote very, very active discussions about options for cash sharing. some apple experts say the tech giant is more likely to divulge those options some time in march. >> i think they can modestly raise the dividend and modestly inc
with our very own defense department, invented the internet in the first place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petitio
: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now do so in a way that's consistent with our laws and our values. >> ifill: attorney general eric holder today defended the justice department's rationale for authorizing the killings of americans overseas. >> we are -- we have as a basis for action that we take a congressional statute that allows us to operate against al qaeda and associated entities not only in pakistan or not only in afghanistan but in other parts of the world. we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we're doing so in a they's consistent with a federal international law. >> ifill: nbc news obtained a 16-page justice department white paper apparently prepared for congressional committees last summer that describes the obama administration's legal reasoni
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a history of discrimination-- mainly in the deep south-- to get federal approval, or pre- clearance, before changing voting procedures or districts. lewis argued the provision-- known as "section five"-- must be preserved. >> there are still forces in this country that want to take us back to another period, but we're not going back. we've come too far. we've made too much progress to go back. the literacy test may be gone; but people are using other means, other tactics and techniques. so we still need section 5 and that's why we are here today standing up fo
is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going to have parts of our community succeed and parts fail. if government fails, we all fail. >> we don't trust government. but we need government. and government is us, when you come right down to it. those folks in washington weren't landed there from mars. they were elected by us. >> it's a complex problem. people want quick answersment but the fact is that there aren't quick answers. >> these aren't things that can be fixed in election cycle. and the question is do we have the political leadership that is willing to invest that way. >> rational thinking leads to one thing, conclusions. and conclusions are not going to solve the debt problem. emotions on the other hand leads to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cuts could slice half a percentage point off economic growth. >> i think an appropriate balance would be to introduce these cuts more gradually and to compensate with larger and more sustained cuts in the longer run to address our long-run fiscal issues. >> ifill: bernanke said the sequester was supposed to be a doomsday weapon
problems remain one of the biggest hurdles to growth. the u.s. is running an annual deficit of $1.1 trillion. >> we still have some fiscal speed bumps coming. and then we have the question of what they actually do on the fiscal side. so, right now, the economy and the fiscal situation are wrapped up into one really nasty ball of wax. >> reporter: keep in mind that many of the international problems that have existed for more than a year haven't gone away. slowing economies in europe and china could slow global growth. and conflict with iran could push up energy prices. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now with more on what to expect from president obama's state of the union address, david gordon, head of research at the eurasia group in washington d.c. >> so if you heard from our report, david, it's all about the economy. that's the big interest for most americans. what can the president propose tomorrow that will get the economy moving without some kind of big stimulus plan? >> so i think that the president's going to try to do a couple of things. first he's
ahead on our program tonight, ford is hiring in high oy, please take a look creating new job. the u.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wh
. >> rose: in less than four days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. economy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so
and extraordinary. tell me how you came to this book and what you hope for to us understanding about the future. >> well, thank you, charlie. you play a unique role in our country, i'm not buttering him up when i say i know you'll agreement i think you're the bester int interviewer that we have in our country, it's great to be with you. (applause) >> and i have thereby ruined every other interview that i will do for this book, i'm sure. i can't-- but thank you for all those kind words. and thank you all for coming. it's great to be back at the 92nd street y. i want to give a shout out to all of the folks at jccs around the country and those on the stair masters upstairs who are watching on the screen. i've always been fascinating by those who try to interpret the evidence compiled by expert communities that have relevance to our common future and i've focused on that in my ca reeferment i did that on climate in the digital world. about eight years ago i went to a conference in switzerland and somebody kd me what are the drivers of global change and i gave an answer, if you were asked you could
the hatches here, if any storms are coming. the last one ruined us totally. >> brown: and long before the worst hit, air travel was in a shambles. well over 4,000 flights were canceled through saturday, sending ripple effects across the country. the snow also halted amtrak and some mass transit service in the northeast. and for the latest on what's expected tonight and this weekend, we turn to bernie rayno, a meteorologist with accuweather. so what is the latest on the track of the storm and expected snow amounts? >> well, i will tell you, the worst of this storm we have been pointing out all week is going to be across southern new england. two storms as you mentioned, and the first storm across the midwest already producing quite a bit of snow across new york state. but the second storm as it strengthens and moves north and northeast, we're already starting to get bands of heavy snow now across new england, into toward boston, providence, hartford, snowing in new york city. and by tonight this storm is really going to start intensifying here. and anywhere in this white, new york city
. they said two people were killed in the raid. u.s. officials say that jets bomb a convoy carrying anti aircraft missiles. >> you will not allow and we will prevent any attacks for hezbollah to smuggle such weapons from syria. is israel attacks, it means that such an attempt by hezbollah was made. >> the contagion from the violence in syria worries the whole region. syria sits on the middle east religious and political fault lines. they connect the war to all of its neighbors, whether they like it or not. the war in syria is exporting trouble. its neighbors are seeing a new threats to their security as a result of the slow collapse of the syrian state. this time, israel felt threatened but all of the country sharing borders and some further afield have seen rising tensions and in some places, bloodshed because of the war. international diplomacy is deadlocked. >> that there has been problems in the turkish border in recent weeks. there are huge flows of refugees over the jordanian border. many tensions in iraq at the moment. lebanon, many connections to syria. the longer this crisis goe
as the rest of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us wit
before the march first deadline. for more on the sequestration and what it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary so let's just pick up with that comment from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things together, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're going to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- n
. the u.s. economy is a puzzling thing. today it added 157,000 jobs but the unemployment rate kicked up to 7.9%. also today the dow industrial average closed above 14,000 for the first time in five years, yet the government reported this week that the economy contracted in the fourth quarter of last year for the first time since 2009. so as congress agrees to delay a showdown over the debt ceiling and faces a march 1 deadline for across the board spending cuts, what to make of this darned economy, david? >> am i supposed to answer that? it is confusing. the stock market is up. employers are hiring, very slowly. the government now tells us that hey -- they hired a lot more last year than previously believed. auto seafls are up 14% from last year. housing sales are coming back. on the other hand the economy took a pause at the end of last year? unemployment is very high, 7.9%. among men between 25 and 54 one out of six is not working. so i think when you cut through all this what do you see? well, the stock market is going like this and the economy is going like this. that can't last. i c
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama made his first second-term foray outside washington today, with a call to stop gun violence. it was part of a campaign-style effort designed to goad congress into action. >> we don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the ameri
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 116 (some duplicates have been removed)